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Your relationship with Food

We just love Renza S (a fantastic blogger who talks about all things diabetes and manages her own type 1) and it turns out she loves Nigella Lawson. So do we! Here's a fun piece of her blog on Nigella and our relationship with food.

Over the weekend, my mum and I took ourselves to see Nigella Lawson in conversation with Gary Mehigan. We were sitting in the first few rows which meant that we would have been within spitting distance of the Domestic Goddess if she were the spitting type. She is not.

Anyone who knows me would be aware that I have a massive crush on Nigella. I love everything about her and, truth be told, I want to be her, or be best friends with her. It’s tragic, but I’m owning it. I fell in love with her because of the way she talks about food with such abandon and passion. I completely understand getting excited at a farmers’ market when it’s suddenly cherry season, or when beautiful fresh asparagus spears are readily available in the supermarket at the start of spring. I get the idea of swooning at the smell and delightful crunch of the crust of a freshly-baked loaf of sourdough, and the desire to immediately slather it in slabs of salted butter.

Her recipe books on the shelf in our kitchen are well used, dog-eared and splattered with whatever ingredients a recipe calls for – the sign of a book that is frequently used and much loved. Her recipes are simple, always turn out as she promises and inevitably taste delicious. Plus, the little blurb she writes to introduce each recipe is always so eloquent and evocative that I can almost taste what I am about to create.

In recent years, I have really come to appreciate that Nigella has stuck to her guns as a food writer and cook, and not swayed into the world of wellness or pseudo-science dietetics. It would be very easy for her to have done that – she would make a killing! After all, who wouldn’t follow – and buy – everything she said if there was a promise of becoming just like Nigella?! She has remained honest to simply cooking food that is unpretentious, delicious and laden with all the things that make food taste good.

On Saturday night, Nigella’s commitment to enjoying food and seeing it as something to be celebrated was clear. She spoke about how food can trigger memories and be the thing that brings family and friends together. She told stories of family recipes and reminisced about where they came from. She spoke of her love of wooden spoons and the stories they can tell.

Read the rest of Renza's post here.

Introducing The Diabetes Kitchen

Over the next few months you'll start seeing your products branded with our new logo - The Diabetes Kitchen which we've been working on for weeks. We're very excited with the updated clean and modern look and we hope you are too.

We're busy working with our dietitians and food technologists to bring you new meals and related products under this brand and have just launched our new Chocolate flavoured Meal Replacements which taste just like a chocolate milkshake - delicious!

Diabetes Meal Replacement

We look forward to sharing our new meal range very soon! We're testing and tasting right now!

Fruit and sugars - what's the story?

Our good friend Professor Kouris (who developed Skinnybiks) shares some advice about berries: Raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, apricots and kiwis have the lowest amount of sugar (7g per cup).

Grapes and blueberries have more sugar at 15g per cup and mangos have the most sugar at 45g per large mango.


If you have diabetes don't avoid fruit, just have smaller portions of the higher sugar fruit e.g half a mango.

There are lots of recipe books available with delicous ideas for fruits!

Read more here.

Stay safe in the Extreme Heat

Well it's going to be super hot in Victoria for the next 2 days. For that reason we won't be despatching orders until Tuesday (as Monday is a public holiday).

Here's some tips for staying safe in the heat. And don't forget to check your blood sugar levels more frequently.

Stay safe in the heat

Introducing Super Smooth Meal Replacement!

Being diagnosed with pre-diabetes can give you the chance to change your lifestyle for the better. It may be that you need to do more exercise or lose weight, or eat healthier foods. Whatever the reason, this diagnosis can give you that little push you may need to get healthier overall.

For many people managing pre-diabetes it's weight loss they need to focus on first. And starting that weight loss is not easy for lots of us! For that reason we've developed a meal replacement to help you get those first kilo's off quickly. Our Super Smooth Chocolate flavoured meal replacement has a delicious taste, only 112 calories and doesn't have that strong aftertaste. Simply mix into 200ml skim milk and replace either breakfast, lunch or dinner. You can even replace 2 meals a day to start with for a short time (our dietitian suggests making sure you have lots of veggies or salad in your diet as well if you are using Super Smooth to replace 2  meals a day).

Launching in early Feb, we know you'll love it! It's packed with nutrients - have a look here.

Diabetes meal replacement

Diabetes management- more than just an eating plan. Christmas edition 🌷

As we head into the festive season and share in the celebrations and festivities, we must not neglect or forget that our blood glucose levels and overall health can often take the brunt of a lot of our "seasonal" choices - food (constant smorgasbord), alcohol, activity (or lack of), sleeping habits. 

Food is not only a source of sustenance and nutrition, it is also made to be enjoyed. Engaging in all of our taste buds and enjoying every bite, mouthful and sip of what we eat or drink is essential, however, we need to be mindful and take a little perspective on the overall impact of our choices beyond the Christmas season. It's like heading into the sunshine to get a dose of Vitamin D and neutralise that skintone without taking safety precautions (hat, umbrella, sunscreen). 🌞

Why you ask? It's just one time of the year you say?
Indeed it's a special time of the year made to be celebrated and enjoyed with family, friends and loved ones.

Whilst it may only be one time of the year, the behaviours we develop and continue, can often extend beyond this period. As a result we can engage in a new set of "normalised" behaviours which stretch out to the following year and suddenly another year has passed. 

So, how do I prepare for the upcoming season, enjoy the festivities whilst still remaining sensible?

1) Plan - diarise the upcoming events✏

2) Prepare - if there is a chance to prepare things in advance or make a list of things, do so 

3) Prioritize - prioritize what events you will attend and host. You can't physically be at 3 breakfast dates all at once. Otherwise you'll find yourself bouncing like a yo-yo ⏰

4) Be active- take this opportunity to go out for walks, runs, swims etc. Activity not only keeps your muscles engaged or frees you from aches and pains, it also refreshes your mind - something we cannot neglect🏏

5) Sleep hygiene- whilst late nights and early starts can be part of the holiday season, it's important that we take this period to also recharge our batteries so we're ready for the upcoming year. A lot of our lifestyle choices, mood, decisions, energy can often be a result of our sleep (or lack of) 🛏

6) Keep yourself accountable to your diabetes management. Whether it's testing your blood glucose levels, taking your meds, injecting your insulin, etc. All these, as tedious as they may seem, are part of you, your health and well-being. Your caring health professional will be able to work with you to plan for the upcoming season.

Most of all enjoy this time, relax and recharge 

Happy living everyone 🍒 🍉


Sherie Sourial- APD, CDE
🌍 www.keepingyouhealthy.com.au

Christmas Order Dates

We want to make sure we get your Diabetes Meals to you (or your loved one if you're sending someone a gift) so please note these dates:

Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide, ACT: order by 19th December
Brisbane, Regional Vic, NSW and SA: order by 17th December
Western Australia and regional Queensland: order by 14th December

Please note we won't be despatching orders between Monday 24th December to Tuesday 2nd January (as our couriers are closed).

About Type 2 diabetes

The most common type of diabetes is type 2. We came across this article by Jenn Miller of jenreviews.com which gives a good understanding of the various types of diabetes, and in particular, type 2 so we thought we'd share. Enjoy.

Type 2 diabetes is usually caused by lifestyle choices and circumstances. While you are definitely at a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes if there is a family history of diabetes, the risk greatly increases if you are overweight or obese, physically inactive, or aging. These risk factors mean that where there used to be a prevalence of older people getting type 2 diabetes due to aging, now there is a surge in diabetes in children and teenagers due to poor dietary choices and an inactive lifestyle.

Certain ethnic groups, such as Pacific Islanders, Indians, Native Americans, and Mexican Americans are also at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is a progressive illness and the treatment is dependent on the stage at which it is diagnosed. Symptoms include pronounced dizziness, an involuntary increase in weight, a constant feeling of hunger and thirst, frequent urination, headaches, and mood swings. While there is no cure for diabetes, preventative measures can be taken if you are diagnosed as prediabetic, and there are multiple steps you can take to manage it after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

Read the full article here.

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Resilience - and diabetes

We just love reading Renza's blog post always. This one we had to share.

November 15, 2018 in DiabetesReal life

I’ve been thinking about resilience. Mostly because recently, I had a few days where mine had gone a little AWOL.

My resilience levels affect a lot of what is going on in my life. When I am feeling super hardy, I think clearly, I am logical and common sense prevails. When faced with a situation, I pause, reflect on different options, try harder to consider others’ points of view and make calculated and deliberate choices. I make less impulsive decisions; I regret less; I feel more buoyant and sure of myself, and confident in how I decide to solve what lies ahead.

When resilience slips, I act without considering all options or potential consequences. And I stop doing a lot of the self-care that usually I do without too much thought. I sleep less; I eat less well. I become less risk-averse, realising – often too late – that the way I acted was not the smartest way, or I do  something that I may regret later. Sometimes I catch myself before it happens, sometimes I don’t.

And it spirals. Because then the worry and concern about the way I reacted starts to play on my mind. And I stop doing what is best for me. I read things into the situation that aren’t there. I second guess myself. Spiral, spiral, spiral…

In diabetes, that reduced resilience plays out in the same ways, just with a diabetes-specific bent. I become a little reckless in the way I bolus – leaving it too late, making guesstimates that I hope won’t cause too many problems, of just plain forget. I ignore alerts and alarms, or silence them by making a quick, but not necessarily smart move. I don’t stop and think and try to understand the situation – I just act. Or I don’t act…I do nothing.

And, of course, in the way of diabetes, that spirals too. Rollercoaster glucose levels prevail as I can do nothing more than chase the impulsive decisions I’ve been making. I stop thinking about the overall picture, instead dealing with the immediate situation at hand.

All of this because I don’t have the resilience stores – the energy, the clarity, the right state of mind – to help guide me through the necessary process, but I need or want to do something … just for the sake of doing something.

I have a wise friend who has provided me counsel during these periods – including this most recent one. As I was jumping in from every which way trying to resolve a situation, she listened, and then gently suggested I take a breath, take a pause and take a step back. ‘Let it marinate. Don’t do anything right now. Just wait a bit.’

Read the rest of Renza's post here.

NSW Seniors Card - approved supplier

We're excited to announce that we are now an approved supplier to the NSW Government Seniors Card program. All members get a 10% discount on our products.

We are also an approved provider to Care Connect.

Questions - please phone us on 1300 79 89 08

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