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It's all abit much...I feel exhausted! 😥

Our dietitian Sherie Sourial writes about diabetes burnout. Enjoy!

-I test my blood glucose levels at 4-6 times/day
- I inject insulin 4 times/day
- I am encouraged to eat healthily
- Low GI
- Having a hypo; high GI
- Going for a run; adjust my insulin, have more carbs...but I'm trying to manage my weight
- For some bizarre reason my glucose levels are elevated and I haven't done anything different 
- Keep between 6-8mmol/l. Avoid highs, avoid lows 
- Integrating diabetes into my life and allowing it not to occupy my thoughts and mind all the time... really? And how is that suppose to happen?.

Sound familiar? 

These are just some things a person with diabetes (type 1 or 2) can go through on any given day...and that's just in relation to their diabetes, let alone other non-diabetes decisions.

Rest assured! U are not alone. 
Firstly remind yourself, you are doing exceptionally well!

No doubt the thought of these points above and even other things can get overwhelming. To know that even when I do follow these things, I will continue to have diabetes, can feel  demotivating... don't let this get you down! You are stronger than this and have come a long way. The fact that you're processing and considering all these things means you have the motivation and will power compared to so many other people around you.

You may be feeling burnout. Yes Diabetes burnout does and can exist. 

As we spring into Spring, it's a chance to embrace the new season and also acknowledge that we can feel the pressures of the year in the air.

Tips to help you manage: 

-Make it real, be real and understand that it's ok to feel burnout and overwhelmed at times,
-Stay motivated. Doing your best can often be enough,
-Have support of family and friends around you, unload your frustrations and concerns by sharing them, 
-Take a quick little getaway; find that comfort and peace in things you enjoy, 
-Recharge those batteries and you will be back on your feet at better capacity again,
-Sometimes we need to take things back to basics and gain perspective again,
- Remember your healthcare professionals also care and happy to hear from you and help whether things are on track, overwhelming or off track. You are not alone.

Happy living everyone 

Keeping You Healthy 🍒
Sherie Sourial (APD,CDE)

W: www.keepingyouhealthy.com.au
E: sherie@keepingyouhealthy.com.au

Depression and diabetes

There may be strong links between depression and diabetes and it is important to seek medical health if you are feeling that you may have depression. One in five people suffer depression and there is no need to feel embarrassed about getting help quickly.

These are some of the symptoms:

Behavioural changes: stopping going out, withdrawing from friends and family, relying on sedatives, unable to concentrate, not getting anything done.

Thoughts: feeling like a failure, feeling worthless, feeling life is not worth it.

Feelings: overwhelmed, guilty, frustrated, unhappy, sad and tearful, irritable.

Physical changes: tired all the time, sick, run down, not sleeping properly, not eating, weight loss, headache and pain.

If you feel you may have depression we urge you to consult your doctor immediately. Depression can be treated and there are various methods that will work differently for each person.

How can you help yourself?

We know it can be very hard to get motivated when you're depressed but these things may help (after you've seen your medical professional also):

  • exercise
  • learning about depression
  • getting involved in activities you love
  • keeping clear of alcohol and sedatives
  • eating healthy foods
  • asking for help

Getting help:

beyondblue.com.au

blackdoginstitute.org.au

Lifeline - phone 131 114 or lifeline.org.au

 

Diabetic retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease caused by diabetes in both T1 and T2. The small blood vessels of the retina at the back of the eye are affected and can cause severe vision loss.

Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent up to 98% of vision loss.

Symptoms: (these may not occur in the early stages so have regular check ups)

  • vision may become blurry
  • objects may float across your eyes and straight lines can appear wavy
  • it can become hard to see 

If you think you have any of these see an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

And remember - have regular eye tests - a medicare rebate is available for most visits. 

More information? Visit www.visioninitiative.org.au

About Pre-diabetes

Nearly one in 4 adults over 25 years old has either diabetes or a condition known as pre-diabetes. 

This is when the blood glucose levels are higher than normal - but not high enough to be diagnosed as Type 2 diabetes.  Pre-diabetic is usually detected via an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.

Common risk factors for Pre-diabetes are:

  • being overweight - especially those who have excess weight around the waistline.
  • being physically inactive
  • having high 'bad cholesterol' levels
  • having high blood pressure
  • having a family history of type diabetes and/or heart disease.

Treatment is life-style change - getting active, eating healthier foods and losing weight.

Please see your doctor if you think you may have pre-diabetes.

If you'd like to know more about getting healthy our dietitians at Diabetes Meals Online offer a free Healthy Lifestyle Course

For more information contact your State Diabetes Organisation on 1300 136 588

 

 

 

Navigating Diabetes Through a High Carb Breakfast

We really enjoy reading Frank's blogs - they're always informative and personal. He writes:

I have always found diabetes extra challenging to manage around big meals. I’m the kind of person who likes to try a bit of everything at a party. I try not to let diabetes get in the way of enjoying myself on special occasions like birthdays or Christmases, because they only come around once a year. Often the consequence of this has been high blood sugar levels that are tricky to bring down in the hours that follow.

One of the biggest advantages of having an insulin pump is the extra flexibility that it gives me to work around high blood sugar levels. With tricks like temporary basal insulin rates, the pump has definitely saved me hours of frustration in trying to bring my blood sugar levels down in the aftermath.

Yesterday my pump got it’s first taste of a high carb meal, as I took the wheels out for a spin over breakfast. I had been craving pancakes all week, so my order was going to be a no brainer.

http://www.type1writes.com/2016/08/08/navigating-diabetes-high-carb-breakfast/

Insulin, glucose & You - one of the best video's we've seen

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