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Me and my love of desserts

Hello, Jan here. I recently had a really bad high. I had a craving for sugar so I ate about 20 grapes and some snakes as I settled down to watch the evening movie. Well, that little treat spiked my blood sugar so high I really thought I would have to go to hospital (and I probably should have looking back now). I laid in bed for the rest of the night, and the next day feeling like hell. 

I'm not on insulin tablets and it's very, very rare I have an episode like that. But it was so bad I never want to feel like that again so I've got an appointment with my new (fabulous) GP and we'll work out if I need to be on them.

But, after a few days when I finally felt normal again, it got me thinking. Just because I've got T2 diabetes doesn't mean I can't have a treat every now and then. So I started researching across the web and I came across Diabetes Australia's recipes for desserts. And boy do they look good! Here's one I made recently - Baked Custard Pots - yum, yum, yum!

  • To Prep: 10 minutes (makes 6 servings)
  • To Cook: 1 hour, 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • olive oil spray
  • 1/4 cups caster sugar
  • 2 teaspoons custard powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla essence
  • 2 cups low-fat milk
  • 3 tablespoons sultanas
  • 1 pinch nutmeg

Method

  1. Pre-heat oven to 160C (315F) and lightly spray 6 ramekins with oil.
  2. Combine the sugar and custard powder in a mixing bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together eggs, egg white and vanilla.
  4. Slowly pour the egg mixture into the sugar mixture and whisk to combine.
  5. Heat the milk in a saucepan over low heat for 3-4 minutes until hot (but not boiling).
  6. Gradually pour the milk into the egg mixture, whisking until well combined.
  7. Divide the sultanas evenly between the ramekins and pour over egg mixture; sprinkle with nutmeg.
  8. Place ramekins in a baking dish and pour boiling water into baking dish until halfway up the sides of the ramekins.
  9. Bake for 1 hour or until set. Allow the ramekins to cool before serving.
Credits
Family Food for Diabetes, Melinda Morrison

Fancy a sweet treat - here are some recipes - treat yourself and enjoy!

Looking after your teeth

People with diabetes are at greater risk of developing gum disease (things like gingivitis and periodontitis) but there are several things you can do to protect yourself.

The signs of gum disease include:

  • red, swollen or tender gums that may bleed
  • gums that have pulled away from teetch
  • bad breath
  • infection between teeth
  • loose teeth

Here's how you can help prevent gum disease:

  • brush and floss daily
  • visit your dentist at least every 6 months
  • try and keep your blood glucose levels within the recommended range
  • don't smoke
  • if you have dentures clean them every day and remove at night, make sure they fit correctly and have your dentist check for pressure spots each visit.

High blood glucose levels can can cause a narrowing of the blood vessels which can reduce the blood supply to gums - increasing risk of gum disease.

For more information contact the Australian Dental Association on 1800 678 383.

Click on this link to get approximate costs of visiting a dentist.

Diabetic retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease caused by diabetes in both T1 and T2. The small blood vessels of the retina at the back of the eye are affected and can cause severe vision loss.

Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent up to 98% of vision loss.

Symptoms: (these may not occur in the early stages so have regular check ups)

  • vision may become blurry
  • objects may float across your eyes and straight lines can appear wavy
  • it can become hard to see 

If you think you have any of these see an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

And remember - have regular eye tests - a medicare rebate is available for most visits. 

More information? Visit www.visioninitiative.org.au

About Pre-diabetes

Nearly one in 4 adults over 25 years old has either diabetes or a condition known as pre-diabetes. 

This is when the blood glucose levels are higher than normal - but not high enough to be diagnosed as Type 2 diabetes.  Pre-diabetic is usually detected via an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.

Common risk factors for Pre-diabetes are:

  • being overweight - especially those who have excess weight around the waistline.
  • being physically inactive
  • having high 'bad cholesterol' levels
  • having high blood pressure
  • having a family history of type diabetes and/or heart disease.

Treatment is life-style change - getting active, eating healthier foods and losing weight.

Please see your doctor if you think you may have pre-diabetes.

If you'd like to know more about getting healthy our dietitians at Diabetes Meals Online offer a free Healthy Lifestyle Course

For more information contact your State Diabetes Organisation on 1300 136 588

 

 

 

Insulin, glucose & You - one of the best video's we've seen

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